How Families Can Build Soft Skills at Home

How Families Can Build Soft Skills at Home
September 16, 2015 GWHS

This area of the website is to serve as a resource for parents, guardians and family members to reference in helping their students develop necessary lifelong skills to be successful after high school.

The term “Soft Skills” is defined at the common-sense, everyday skills, like getting along with others, that help youth succeed in all aspects of life. ¬ Many work sills have benefits that extend beyond the work place. ¬ Learning work skills can contribute to a youth’s ability to function independently in the community, have positive experiences in post-secondary education, and thrive in social situations. ¬ There are several strategies available to families to help their youth develop necessary work skills.

Work readiness skills, which include “Soft Skills,” fall into four categories.

  1. Communication Skills
  2. Interpersonal Skills
  3. Decision Making Skills
  4. Lifelong Learning Skills

 

September 16, 2015

Communication Skills

What You Can Do

Is texting shaping the writing style of your youth? ¬ According to this July 2015 article¬ , texting and social media are having an adverse effect on youth’s ability to communicate in work skill situations such as interviewing for a job with business ¬ leaders. ¬ At home, keep an eye out on your student’s writing style and make sure that he or she understands that it is important to use correct punctuation, complete sentences, and accurate spelling in other forms of written communication.

 

September 21, 2015

Communication Skills

What You Can Do¬

Have your student practice sending thank you notes for appropriate occasions. ¬ Sending thank you notes is more than good manners, it also provides youth with a perfect opportunity to practice proper grammar and give careful consideration to exactly what they want to say.

 

October 6, 2015

Communication Skills

What You Can Do

Bring a job application home or find one online and have your student fill it out. ¬ This will be an opportunity to see if your son or daughter needs help understanding written instructions in addition to seeing how your students talks about their skills and experiences.